Today in Soap Opera History (June 15)

1981: Edge of Night's Raven planned on becoming Mrs. Whitney.
1983: All My Children's Opal held a press conference.
1984: Guiding Light's Beth and Lujack hit the beach on horseback.
1999: Another World's Tyrone told Marley he loved her.
"All true histories contain instruction; though, in some, the treasure may be hard to find, and when found, so trivial in quantity that the dry, shrivelled kernel scarcely compensates for the trouble of cracking the nut."
― Anne Brontë in "Agnes Grey"

"Today in Soap Opera History" is a collection of the most memorable, interesting and influential events in the history of scripted, serialized programs. From birthdays and anniversaries to scandals and controversies, every day this column celebrates the soap opera in American culture.

On this date in...

1966: Antony Ponzini debuted as Danny Fargo on Another World. Danny hit Missy Palmer (Carol Roux) with his car. He helped her into the car with her wallet left behind on the street. She passed out and woke up at his place where she told him her name was Ann Summers.

1966: On The Guiding Light, Bill Bauer (Ed Bryce) lamented the failed relationship with his son, Ed (Robert Gentry).

Today in Soap Opera History (June 14)

1967: Dark Shadows' Maggie remained frustrated locked in a cell.
1983: General Hospital faced a hostage crisis.
1993: As the World Turns' Hal and Barbara were remarried.
1996: All My Children's Hayley and Brian wanted to relive their prom.
"All true histories contain instruction; though, in some, the treasure may be hard to find, and when found, so trivial in quantity that the dry, shrivelled kernel scarcely compensates for the trouble of cracking the nut."
― Anne Brontë in "Agnes Grey"

"Today in Soap Opera History" is a collection of the most memorable, interesting and influential events in the history of scripted, serialized programs. From birthdays and anniversaries to scandals and controversies, every day this column celebrates the soap opera in American culture.

On this date in...

1967: On Dark Shadows, locked in a cell in the Old House basement, Maggie Evans (Kathryn Leigh Scott) opened the music box when she heard Barnabas (Jonathan Frid) coming, pretending that she had been listening to it. He didn't believe her and left Maggie frustrated in the cell.

Today in Soap Opera History (June 13)

1984: Guiding Light's Lujack and Beth hit the beach.
1984: Edge of Night's Gunther noticed something off about Sky.
1985: Patch arrived in Salem on Days of our Lives.
2005: GH's Michael wasn't thrilled Carly had married Alcazar.
"All true histories contain instruction; though, in some, the treasure may be hard to find, and when found, so trivial in quantity that the dry, shrivelled kernel scarcely compensates for the trouble of cracking the nut."
― Anne Brontë in "Agnes Grey"

"Today in Soap Opera History" is a collection of the most memorable, interesting and influential events in the history of scripted, serialized programs. From birthdays and anniversaries to scandals and controversies, every day this column celebrates the soap opera in American culture.

On this date in...

1966: On Another World, Lee (Gaye Huston) gave Mike Bauer (Gary Pillar) a warm welcome home.

1966: Most of Dark Shadows' first episode was taped. Episode #1 was shot  twice with the second tape being the one that actually aired.

1983: On All My Children, Palmer (James Mitchell), Daisy (Gillian Spencer) and Bonkers (executive producer Jacqueline Babbin's real life cat) spent a romantic evening at home.

Today in Soap Opera History (June 12)

1981: General Hospital's Luke had a calling.
1984: Jack Boyd arrived in Edge of Night's Monticello.
1990: A topless Carly impressed Justin on Days of our Lives.
2000: Bold and the Beautiful's Brooke played footsie with Thorne.
"All true histories contain instruction; though, in some, the treasure may be hard to find, and when found, so trivial in quantity that the dry, shrivelled kernel scarcely compensates for the trouble of cracking the nut."
― Anne Brontë in "Agnes Grey"

"Today in Soap Opera History" is a collection of the most memorable, interesting and influential events in the history of scripted, serialized programs. From birthdays and anniversaries to scandals and controversies, every day this column celebrates the soap opera in American culture.

On this date in...

1936: Popular serial Just Plain Bill aired on CBS Radio for the final time. The show returned in September on NBC, where it remained until 1954.

1941: On The Guiding Light, Rose Kransky (Ruth Bailey) remained after hours with her boss, Jack Felzer, to compensate for the time she took to attend Ned and Mary's wedding. Jack asked about the nuptials, which led to a discussion of how Rose, Ned, and Mary all grew up in Five Points. Rose realized why Jack knew so much about her background: He had read about her in the newspapers during her recent court appearance. Jack told her that he admired her conduct under such trying circumstances. She admitted that she wanted to escape her former life. Implying that he was romantically interested in her, Jack counseled Rose to simply accept her destiny.

Patrika Darbo Calls Out NATAS in Statement About Daytime Emmys Inequity, Asks for Complete Audit

Primetime Emmy winner Patrika Darbo called out the integrity of the National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences (NATAS) in a statement released Monday, ten days after it was revealed the Daytime Emmy award she received in
April was being taken back. She also revealed a second winner (Eric Nelsen of The Bay, who won in the digital drama supporting category) also had violations but was allowed to keep his anyway. She also called for an outside audit of the submission and voting process after questioning the "inequity in this year's Daytime Emmys based on ageism, gender inequality, and perceived favoritism". Read her very revealing statement below.

***

STATEMENT BY ACTRESS PATRIKA DARBO REGARDING HAVING HER DAYTIME EMMY RESCINDED BY NATAS

As disappointed as I am about having my Daytime Emmy taken back by NATAS, as a Co-Governor of the Performers Peer Group at the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences in Los Angeles, overseeing the Primetime Emmys, I am more concerned about how this incident tarnishes the Emmy brand. I did not submit myself for Daytime Emmy consideration, my producers at The Bay made the submission. However, at the end of the day, the onus for a correct submission is not on the producers of The Bay, or any other producers; the ultimate responsibility lies squarely on the shoulders of NATAS. They should have vetted each and every submission and then notified those submitting of any submission errors in advance of the voting and the ceremony.

I understand that in my category there were at least four submission errors. NATAS was made aware of these potential errors two days prior to the ceremony and made a conscious decision not to deal with it until after the ceremony was over. These errors were then not brought to light until after the Daytime Emmys were presented and awarded, meaning that other actors who did properly submit have now lost their chance at winning a Daytime Emmy.

In addition to the rule violations in my category, there was a similar rule violation in the category for Supporting Actor in a Digital Drama. I was made aware of this violation when NATAS called to inform me of the situation. After taking back my Daytime Emmy, NATAS called another female performer in my category to re-issue the Emmy, as she was the next runner up according to the accountancy firm. The very next day, NATAS called her back and said she could not have it as she had submitted one episode too many (the rule is that one episode may be submitted for consideration and the new recipient submitted two). However, the winner of the Daytime Emmy in a Supporting Actor in a Digital Drama was allowed to keep his statue, (the rule is that four episodes may be submitted for consideration, the recipient submitted five episodes). NATAS determined after the fact that the rules for Supporting Actor and his show were “ambiguous”.

As a performer in film and television for over three decades, who fights diligently for fairness and equity for my fellow actors by volunteering my time and leadership at both SAG/AFTRA and the TV Academy (ATAS), the arbitrary and after-the-fact ruling feels inequitable and wrong. A rule is a rule. If the rule is going to be changed or declared “ambiguous” it should be done prior to voting, not after the votes are in and the Emmys
have been handed out.

The inequity in this year’s Daytime Emmys based on ageism, gender inequality, and perceived favoritism is, in my opinion, a big blow to the Emmy brand. The TV Academy, who administers the Prime Time Emmy Awards, is very clear that Emmys are awarded to those who achieve excellence in television. I’m beginning to wonder what NATAS feels the Emmys stand for.

For the sake of the overall Emmy brand, I feel an outside audit of the submission and voting process of this past Daytime Emmy Awards would be a show of good will by NATAS and would help to restore integrity and confidence in the Daytime Emmy Awards.

Today in Soap Opera History (June 11)

1973: The Doctors' Althea and Carolee caught up.
1979: Another World's Janice tried to be understanding.
1996: All My Children's Trevor could not feel his legs.
1999: One Life to Live's Nora and Sam awaited DNA test results.
"All true histories contain instruction; though, in some, the treasure may be hard to find, and when found, so trivial in quantity that the dry, shrivelled kernel scarcely compensates for the trouble of cracking the nut."
― Anne Brontë in "Agnes Grey"

"Today in Soap Opera History" is a collection of the most memorable, interesting and influential events in the history of scripted, serialized programs. From birthdays and anniversaries to scandals and controversies, every day this column celebrates the soap opera in American culture.

On this date in...

1941: On The Guiding Light, the day of Mary (Sarajane Wells) and Ned's (Ed Prentiss) wedding finally arrived.

1966: The very first scenes for Dark Shadows were taped.

1973: On The Doctors, Dr. Althea Davis (Elizabeth Hubbard) and Nurse Carolee Simpson (Carolee Campbell) caught up on the latest happenings with Mona and Penny.