News Round-up: Kristen Alderson, DTV, Tim Riggins

INTERVIEW: OLTL's Kristen Alderson (Starr)
On her Emmy submission: "I submitted the episode when Starr first found out that the baby had died. She was in the hospital and she was talking to Blair and Marcy, wondering why the baby had not come back yet, and she is all excited. Dr. Joplin comes in with the horrible news, and we all figure it out right then and there. I think what was so great about the scenes was that everyone did such a great job. It was so realistic! I tend to get caught up in the scenes, as well. So, I watched my tape, and I am really happy with it. The other years that I have submitted my stuff, they would go, 'Oh, you deserve it!' But, I never felt worthy of it. But now, I really feel confident with what I submitted."

B&B makeup artist creates line of foot concealers
Allyson Carey, a makeup artist for THE BOLD AND THE BEAUTIFUL, has created a line of foot concealers to cover up scabs, scars and corns. T!ntalize ranges in colors from Vanilla Mousse to Chile Chocolate and is sweat as well as smudge-proof. So even if your tootsies are as moist as your armpits during Bikram yoga, this concealer shouldn’t ruin your socks.

GL's Caitlin VanZandt on Tom Pelphrey's return
"I hope I get to work with him [this time around], I doubt it but it is quite awesome. It'll be good to see him again. He's been in L.A. for so long, it'll be nice to catch up. On my first day [at GL] a weird, half-asleep guy with messy hair said, 'Hi. I'm Tom.' And he literally took me under his wing and showed me around and bought me lunch. It'll be nice to begin and end my time at GUIDING LIGHT around him."

Survey: Viewers Report Better Picture Across All Channels After Getting Converter Box
Three quarters of over-the-air analog viewers polled said they received a better picture across all their channels after getting a digital converter box. That is according to a study conducted by SmithGeiger and commissioned by the National Association of Broadcasters. NAB declined to make the survey available and had not returned an e-mail and phone call at press time to explain why. According to NAB, the study found that 47% of respondents said they had seen a "major improvement" in TV reception. In addition, 54% said they were receiving more channels while only 8% said they were receiving fewer.

FNL's Connie Britton and Kyle Chandler on the possible return of Tim Riggins
“We don’t know exactly who is coming back next season,” Britton said, “but I’m pretty sure Tim is going to be there, he is so loved.”

Chandler agreed. “The show could live on as FRIDAY NIGHT RIGGINS if it had to,” he joked.

SKINS: Channel 4 plans movie spin-off
Channel 4 has confirmed it is planning a movie version of hit E4 teen drama SKINS. The broadcaster said that Film4 and Company Pictures, the independent producer that makes the show, were in "preliminary talks" about a big screen spin-off. The movie is the latest planned Skins spin-off, with a novel based on the exploits of the group of Bristol teenagers also in the pipeline.

A Resting Place of Reruns Tries to Turn Up the Heat
The New York Times takes an interesting look at the strategy of TV Land and how viewers prefer to see classic reruns versus new reality shows.

Deep Soap: Sinister Plot
Sara Bibel writes: "There’s a theory I keep hearing: the networks are deliberately tanking soaps so that the ratings will go down and they’ll be able to cancel them. If the conspiracy theory were true, executives would be actively working towards the elimination of their own jobs. Without soaps, the networks would, in all probability, give much of the day part back to their affiliates. Nobody wants to get laid off. The conspiracy theory gives everyone too much credit. The people who say boneheaded things in interviews, can’t keep track of when actors contracts expire, and let spoilers leak all over the internet are not masterminding a brilliant fiendish plot. Although, it would be the most interesting storyline in daytime if they were."

INTERVIEW: Soap vet Linda Dano
On ANOTHER WORLD's final episode: "I remember so little of it because I mostly cried. I’ve never seen the last episode; I’ve never been able to watch it. I know that sounds so dramatic – my husband, if he were alive, would go, 'Oh, for God’s sake, you’re such a dramatic thing.' -- but I really haven’t. Steve Schnetzer (Cass) and I always talked about pouring ourselves nice, big drinks, sitting down and watching it together. But, we’ve never done it. There’s something so final about that. For me, I’m better off believing that I’m on a vacation, and it really isn’t over. For lots of actors who were on shows for a long time, primetime as well as daytime, you become such a family. You spend more time with these people than you ever do your own family. And when the time comes and it ends, as everything does, it’s just the saddest, saddest, terrible thing."

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