Book Recommendation: Agnes Nixon's 'My Life to Live'


I normally wouldn't make a book recommendation only three chapters into a read, but there's a new release that will be the exception to that rule. "My Life to Live: How I Became the Queen of Soaps When Men Ruled the Airwaves" was released last week, and so far it's as fascinating as you might expect. Agnes Nixon's memoir takes readers on a journey through her trailblazing rise to the top of the television industry, including behind-the-scenes stories from some of the most beloved soaps of all time. Featuring a foreward to All My Children superfan Carol Burnett, "My Life to Life" starts with Nixon looking back on her family, absent father, and life in Nashville. I can't wait to read more, and highly recommend you read along with me. You can order on Amazon here.

Today in Soap Opera History (March 30)

1970: A World Apart and The Best of Everything premiered on ABC.
Another World spinoff Somerset premiered on NBC.
Dark Shadows' Maggie found a mysterious note.
"All true histories contain instruction; though, in some, the treasure may be hard to find, and when found, so trivial in quantity that the dry, shrivelled kernel scarcely compensates for the trouble of cracking the nut."
― Anne Brontë in "Agnes Grey"

"Today in Soap Opera History" is a collection of the most memorable, interesting and influential events in the history of scripted, serialized programs. From birthdays and anniversaries to scandals and controversies, every day this column celebrates the soap opera in American culture.

On this date in...

1970: Daytime soap opera A World Apart premiered on ABC. The show was created by Katherine L. Phillips, Irna Phillips' daughter, and combined Irna's own life story with examples of the generation gap. Susan Sarandon and Matthew Cowles were siblings Patrice and Chris Kahlman, adopted children of soap opera writer Better Kahlman (played by Elizabeth Lawrence and later Augusta Dabney) who had never married. A well-written family drama in the World Turns vein, it also featured Susan Sullivan, James Noble, Kathleen Maguire, Stephen Elliott, Tom Ligon and William Price. Set in Chicago, and taped in New York, its directors included Tom Donovan and Walter Gorman. Donovan also produced. It was cancelled June 25, 1971.

1970: Daytime soap opera The Best of Everything premiered on ABC. James Lipton adapted it from the Rona Jaffe novel about the woes of working girls in New York, set mainly at Key Publishing Company. The main characters were Linda Warren (Patty McCormack), April Morrison (Julie Mannix), Kim Jordan (Katherine Glass) and Barbara Lamont (Rochelle Oliver). They were tormented by their ruthless editor, Amanda Key (Gale Sondergaard), and counseled by the warm and loving Violet Jordan (Geraldine Fitzgerald). The series lasted less than six months, with the finale airing on September 25, 1970.

1970: On Another World, Russ Matthews was upset when the expensive crib his wife, Rachel (Robin Strasser), ordered arrived. She tried to gain sympathy with tears but it didn't work.

Today in Soap Opera History (March 29)

1962: Search for Tomorrow's Marge was upset when adoption
plans fell through. 1982: SFT made its NBC debut.
1982: The first daytime episode of Capitol aired on CBS.
2004: All My Children's Kendall told Bianca her baby was dead.
"All true histories contain instruction; though, in some, the treasure may be hard to find, and when found, so trivial in quantity that the dry, shrivelled kernel scarcely compensates for the trouble of cracking the nut."
― Anne Brontë in "Agnes Grey"

"Today in Soap Opera History" is a collection of the most memorable, interesting and influential events in the history of scripted, serialized programs. From birthdays and anniversaries to scandals and controversies, every day this column celebrates the soap opera in American culture.

On this date in...

1962: On Search for Tomorrow, Marge Bergman (Melba Rae) reeled from Monica's (Barbara Baxley) decision to not give Jimmy up for adoption. She later went to friends Joanne (Mary Stuart) and Arthur Tate (Terry O'Sullivan) for solace.

Pop TV 'The Young and the Restless' and 'The Bold and the Beautiful' Ratings (March 20-24, 2017)


The Nielsen ratings are in for Pop TV for the week of March 20-24, 2017. Same-day repeats of CBS soap opera The Young and the Restless made the cable Top 150 rankings on Monday, Thursday and Friday.

DateTotal ViewersAdults 18-49 RatingRank Among Cable Programs
Monday, March 6450,0000.06141st
Tuesday, March 7--Not in Top 150
Wednesday, March 8--Not in Top 150
Thursday, March 9431,0000.05141st
Friday, March 10397,0000.04146th

The Bold and the Beautiful did not appear in the Top 150 during the week.

Today in Soap Opera History (March 28)

1977: Ryan's Hope's Maeve tried to reason with her son-in-law.
1983: Guiding Light's Silas held Quint at gunpoint.
1997: The final episode of ABC daytime soap opera The City.
2008: Guiding Light's Gus crashed his motorcycle.
"All true histories contain instruction; though, in some, the treasure may be hard to find, and when found, so trivial in quantity that the dry, shrivelled kernel scarcely compensates for the trouble of cracking the nut."
― Anne Brontë in "Agnes Grey"

"Today in Soap Opera History" is a collection of the most memorable, interesting and influential events in the history of scripted, serialized programs. From birthdays and anniversaries to scandals and controversies, every day this column celebrates the soap opera in American culture.

On this date in...

1955: On Hawkins Falls, reporter Mitch Fredericks (Jim Bannon) and Millie Flagle (Ros Twohey) persuaded the biggest donor to the town's fair, Andy Anderson, that he had psychic powers. Once Andy was convinced of his abilities, Mitch got him to predict that Hawkins Falls would become a booming industrial city, with the intention of printing a story quoting Andy's predictions. Mitch believed he could fulfill the prophecy by publishing it, thus bringing interest and future success to Hawkins Falls.

Pop TV 'The Young and the Restless' and 'The Bold and the Beautiful' Ratings (March 13-17, 2017)


The Nielsen ratings are in for Pop TV for the week of March 13-17, 2017. Same-day repeats of CBS soap opera The Young and the Restless and The Bold and the Beautiful did not make the cable Top 150 for the week. Both series only broadcast episodes Monday through Wednesday due to the opening of the NCAA Men's Basketball Tournament.