PREVIEW: BOARDWALK EMPIRE ("The Pony") & TREME ("Promised Land")

The third season of BOARDWALK EMPIRE continues on Sunday, November 4 at 9 p.m. ET/PT on HBO.

In "The Pony," Gillian (Gretchen Mol) makes her peace with Jimmy’s death, though not with Nucky (Steve Buscemi), as Gyp (Bobby Cannavale) arrives to play ally. Working off his debt to O’Banion (Arron Shiver), Van Alden (Michael Shannon) attends a meeting with Capone (Stephen Graham) and Torrio (Greg Antonacci); later, after a workplace meltdown, he considers Sigrid’s (Christiane Seidel) case for staying put versus resuming a life on the lam. With help from Gaston Means (Stephen Root), Nucky pays an unscheduled visit to Andrew Mellon (James Cromwell), offering the Treasury Secretary a recommendation and a business proposal. Margaret (Kelly Macdonald) makes a stand on birth control; Nucky and Owen (Charlie Cox) shop for a birthday pony; Billie (Meg Chambers Steedle) eyes a future on the silver screen, to Nucky’s chagrin.

Watch a sneak peek below:



ABOUT BOARDWALK EMPIRE
Atlantic City, New Year’s Eve, 1922: The Roaring `20s are about to begin in earnest. Despite a booming economy, alcohol is scarce and gangster violence is heating up. With his marriage to Margaret already on the rocks, Nucky Thompson faces the challenge of mending old relationships and encounters new competition from a hairtrigger gangster determined to siphon off his business.

Season 3 of TREME continues at 10 p.m. ET/PT with "Promised Land."

It’s Carnival time: Toni (Melissa Leo) finds Judge Gatling (Tim Reid) dispensing judicial orders and potables at Galatoire’s. Janette (Kim Dickens) seeks counsel from Emeril Lagasse and deconstructs crawfish etouffĂ©e with Al Roker. Sonny (Michiel Huisman) falls on the wagon. As Nelson (Jon Seda) schmoozes, Annie (Lucia Micarelli) sits in with the Neville Brothers at the Washington, D.C. Mardi Gras Ball.



ABOUT TREME
First, the people came back. Then, the crime. Now, more than two years after the near death of a great city, the money is starting to arrive, which would sound like a solution if this were some place other than New Orleans, and this was some other era but America at the millennium.

For the people of New Orleans, even the promises of redevelopment come with strings attached, and every dollar that shows up – whether from government disaster relief, or from venture capital, or even from those seeking to remake New Orleans in the wake of Katrina – carries with it new dynamics and new risks. National interest has waned, moving on to the next headline, but those who know and love the Crescent City have no choice. They must find their way back to what matters in the life of their city. However, little of what they can bring to bear yields a quick result, and nothing about New Orleans – its government, its police department and courtrooms, its school system – works as it should. Nothing is easy.

In the end, their only weapons are community. And culture.

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